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Forgotten firearms *the Nock gun*

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    Forgotten firearms *the Nock gun*



    the Nock gun was a seven-barreled flintlock smoothbore firearm used by the Royal Navy during the early stages of the Napoleonic Wars. It is a type of volley gun adapted for ship-to-ship fighting, but was limited in its use because of the powerful recoil and eventually discontinued.

    The weapon was invented by British engineer James Wilson in 1779, and named after Henry Nock, the London-based armaments manufacturer contracted to build the gun. It was intended to be fired from the rigging of Royal Navy warships onto the deck in the event that the ship was boarded by enemy sailors. Theoretically, the simultaneous discharge of seven barrels would have devastating effect on the tightly packed groups of enemy sailors.[1]

    The volley gun consisted of seven barrels welded together, with small vents drilled through from the central barrel to the other six barrels clustered around it. The central barrel screwed onto a hollow spigot which formed the chamber and was connected to the vent.

    The gun operated using a standard flintlock mechanism, with the priming gunpowder igniting the central charge via a small vent. When the flash reached the central chamber, all seven charges ignited at once, firing more or less simultaneously.[1]

    The first models featured rifled barrels, but this made loading a long and cumbersome process, resulting in all following models being manufactured with smoothbore barrels.

    During the early stages of the Napoleonic Wars, 500 Nock guns were purchased by the Royal Navy. However, attempts to use the gun during combat quickly revealed design flaws. The recoil caused by all seven barrels firing at once was more powerful than had been thought, and frequently injured or broke the shoulder of whoever was firing the gun, and in any case made the gun very difficult to control. Furthermore, officers were reluctant to issue the guns during battle out of fear that the flying sparks would set fire to the surrounding rigging and sails.[1]

    A smaller, lighter version was produced, which shortened the gun's range, but the recoil was still too powerful for sailors to feel comfortable firing it. The few models purchased by the Royal Navy were removed from service in 1804.

    Jim Bowie from the alamo


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nock_gun

    #2
    I could not imagine trusting my life to such a rifle.
    If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my children may know peace.
    Thomas Paine 1776

    You have me confused with a man that puts up with women's shit!

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Mr.Glock View Post
      I could not imagine trusting my life to such a rifle.
      It's not a rifle--it's a 7-barreled smooth-bore musket. In Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe series of novels, Sgt. Patrick Harper carries a Nock Volley Gun that was given to him by Sharpe.

      Also, Ian at Forgotten Weapons did a video on it:
      If you could kick the person in the pants responsible for most of your troubles, you wouldn't sit for a month. -- Theodore Roosevelt

      [A]ll the whores and politicians will look up and shout "Save us!"... and I'll whisper "no." — Rorschach, Watchmen

      If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

      She was no cook--she was an arsonist. -- Alfred Hitchcock

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Mr.Glock View Post
        I could not imagine trusting my life to such a rifle.
        men in those days were not scaredy cats like you.

        Comment


        • Lurker66
          Lurker66 commented
          Editing a comment
          Yer giving yerself away...

        • Mr.Glock
          Mr.Glock commented
          Editing a comment
          Naaaaaa skeered wasn’t taught on our place growing up.
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